SUBJECT :With nearly 170 species of butterflies, 250 species of moths and still counting, wildlife is bouncing back in Nagaland. 

A pair of Great Nawabs. Picture courtesy: Sanjay Sondhi

Guwahati, May 25, 2018: With nearly 170 species of butterflies, 250 species of moths and still counting, wildlife is bouncing back in Nagaland.

This was revealed at the first Nagaland Biodiversity Meet organised in the state from May 9 to 16 by The Energy & Resources Institute (TERI), New Delhi, and Dehradun-based Titli Trust to learn about and document the biodiversity of Tizu Valley Biodiversity Conservation and Livelihood Network, comprising the villages of Sukhai, Ghukhuyi and Kivikhu in Zunheboto district of the state.

"While the records from the meet are still being compiled, more than 170 species of butterflies, including the spectacular Stately Nawab (Charaxes dolon) and the Great Nawab (Charaxes eudamippus), were recorded. The other interesting butterfly species recorded include the Orange-breasted Freak ( Calinaga brahma), Manipur Map (Araschnia dohertyi) and Khaki Silverline ( Spindasis rukmini). The identities of many other recorded species are being verified," Sanjay Sondhi of Titli Trust told The Telegraph on Thursday. The moth species recorded include the male and female of the rare Picture-winged Leaf Moth (Glanycus insolitus).

Sondhi said 16 people, including wildlife researchers, naturalists, students and nature lovers from all across the country including Calcutta, Dehradun, Delhi, Bongaigaon, Calicut and Malappuram gathered for the meet. "It seems that wildlife is bouncing back in Nagaland. If so many species can be found in three villages, such a model can be replicated in other villages as well," he said. Many village councils have banned hunting within their jurisdictions.

The Tizu Valley Biodiversity Conservation and Livelihood Network was formed by the three villages voluntarily to protect their forests and associated biodiversity.

The visitors participated in biodiversity surveys, stayed in homestays in the villages of Sukhai and Khivikhu, tasted sumptuous local cuisine, watched traditional Sema dances and engaged with the local community to understand their activities to conserve natural resources.

"Not only will the presence of the visitors boost ecotourism, the biodiversity assessment will add to the knowledge of the faunal biodiversity of Nagaland," Sondhi said. The records of birds, butterflies and moths will be shared through Biodiversity Atlas - India.


Source: The Telegraph India